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In Closings of $3M Med-Mal Trial, Attorney Says Circumstantial Proof Is Strong | Florida Trial Video

Posted by Courtroom View Network on May 2, 2015 12:49:00 PM

John Dill tells jurors that circumstantial evidence proves that an embolism during Jorgina Araujo’s 2011 hysterectomy caused a stroke that rendered her partially blind. Araujo, represented by Dill, sued anesthesiologist Dr. Tatiana Eisner and nurse anesthetist Heidi Aleman-Ortega for malpractice during the procedure. Watch the trial on demand.


It can be difficult to effectively argue the value of circumstantial evidence to jurors accustomed to television courtroom dramas that contain "smoking-gun" direct evidence in a case. However, during closings of Araujo v. Eisner, Morgan & Morgan's John Dill uses a "rainy day" analogy to argue the strength of the circumstantial evidence at issue in his medical malpractice case.

Click Here FREE Florida Trial Video SamplesDill represented Jorgina Araujo, who claimed an embolism during her 2011 hysterectomy led to a stroke that left her partially blind. In the medical malpractice trial against the procedure's anesthesiology team, Dr. Tatiana Eisner and Heidi Aleman-Ortega, Dill presented circumstantial evidence of malpractice, which included Araujo's claims of partial blindness after the procedure and a single, arguably questionable entry on Araujo's surgical records. By contrast, defendants claimed that it was impossible for Araujo to have suffered a stroke during the procedure. 

Without "smoking gun" proof tying the stroke to the defendants' care, Dill analogized the circumstantial evidence at trial to hearing thunder just before a person comes inside the courtroom, drenched and carrying a wet umbrella. Even if the person that has just entered denies that it's raining, Dill says, the circumstantial evidence is enough to prove that it's likely raining outside. Similarly, Dill explains, the circumstantial evidence at trial is enough to establish the defendants' negligence, despite their denials.

It's an analogy that paints the power of circumstantial evidence in terms a jury can understand. Dill's closing ultimately helped lead the parties to a settlement as the jury worked through a second day of deliberations. 


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Topics: Negligence, Medical Malpractice, Florida, araujo v. eisner, Video Highlight